Rabbi Bruce “Dov” Forman

(He/Him/His)

Post-Denominational

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Conversion requirements

Brit milah/Hatafat dam brit:

Required (Supervision is not required.)

Mikvah:

Not required

Beit din:

Not required

Conversion location:

Weston, Fla.

Mentoring sessions available in:

English

Student levels accepted:

Mitzvah, Chai, Scholarship

Conversion requirements during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic

Brit milah/Hatafat dam brit:

Required (No change)

Mikvah:

Not required (No change)

Beit din:

Not required (No change)

I am happy to work with

Families with children, People who identify as LGBTQ, People in interfaith or dual-faith relationships

Personal statement

When I was about 50 years old, I had an unusual religious experience. Having practicing psychology my entire adult life, I’m sure you can imagine what a shock it was for me to hear an angelic voice beckoning me to return to Judaism and become a rabbi — but that’s exactly what I did. I was attracted to the spiritual aspects of Judaism, as my mother’s family were Chassidim who came from Galicia, Poland. They assimilated after arriving at Ellis Island and moving to Brooklyn, NY. I was raised in a “Conservadox” environment and further assimilated up until my epiphany. Now I consider myself simply Jewish, because it doesn’t really tell us anything about a person by putting them in a box with a label. Besides, I think all branches of Judaism have something valuable to teach us.

For years, I’ve struggled with the question: “How does one be authentically Jewish in a modern world?” Whether Jewish by birth or by choice, I believe this is a question we must all address. I learned from Rabbi Joseph Gelberman, my Rebbe of blessed memory, that being a good person who demonstrates chesed (kindness, loving kindness) to other human beings, G-d’s most precious creations, is at the heart of Judaism. I try to do this through my work as a psychologist and as a rabbi. I feel very blessed to have discovered my spiritual path to finding joy in living each day, and I feel compelled to help others do the same.

Education

Rabbinical Seminary International
Smicha (Rabbinical Ordination)

Duke University
Doctor of Philosophy, Counseling Psychology